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2 edition of sensorimotor cortical control of face, jaw and tongue movements of the Macaca fascicularis. found in the catalog.

sensorimotor cortical control of face, jaw and tongue movements of the Macaca fascicularis.

Michael Alexander Sirisko

sensorimotor cortical control of face, jaw and tongue movements of the Macaca fascicularis.

by Michael Alexander Sirisko

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Published .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Pagination247 leaves
Number of Pages247
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14748169M

We investigated the role of the cerebral cortex, particularly the face/tongue area of the primary sensorimotor (SMI) cortex (face/tongue) and supplementary motor area (SMA), in volitional swallowing by recording movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs). Studies of mechanisms of feeding behavior are important in a society where aging- and disease-related feeding disorders are increasingly prevalent. It is important to evaluate the clinical relevance of animal models of the disease and the control. Our present study quantifies macaque hyolingual and jaw kinematics around swallowing cycles to determine the extent to which macaque swallowing.

  INTRODUCTION. Swallowing is a complex sensorimotor function that is controlled by cortical, subcortical, and brainstem mechanisms [Miller, ] and recruits the coordinated activity of orofacial, pharyngeal, laryngeal, respiratory, and esophageal muscles [Doty and Bosma, ].Swallowing comprises a voluntary oral preparatory phase during which ingested material is . Recently, we found that electrical stimulation of motor cortex caused monkeys to make coordinated, complex movements. These evoked movements were arranged across the cortex in a map of spatial locations to which the hand moved. We suggest that some of the subdivisions previously described within primary motor and premotor cortex may represent different types of actions that monkeys tend to.

And it's this part of the premotor cortex that governs the movements of the upper part of the face. Now, one explanation to this clinical conundrum is that the upper part of the face is spared, simply because, the medial face of the hemisphere is not supplied by the middle cerebral artery at all, it's supplied by the anterior cerebral artery. This possibly reveals a more active role of the primary sensorimotor cortex in tongue movement (i.e., an oral component of deglutition) than in throat clearing and planning. The oral components of swallowing are the most voluntary elements of deglutition [Ertekin and Aydogdu, ] and thus, are expected to be represented more cortically.


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Sensorimotor cortical control of face, jaw and tongue movements of the Macaca fascicularis by Michael Alexander Sirisko Download PDF EPUB FB2

In the case of face MI, studies by ourselves and others have shown that, consistent with stimulation and imaging studies in humans (for review, see Martin and Sessle,Martin et al.,Nordstrom, ), short-train ICMS of monkey face MI evokes elemental movements such as jaw opening or tongue protrusion (e.g., Huang et al.,Martin et al.,Murray and Sessle, a; Cited by:   For example, TMS of face MI can activate one or more orofacial muscles from an extensive area within face MI, and fMRI has revealed that semiautomatic (e.g., swallowing) as well as elemental (e.g., tongue protrusion, jaw opening) movements and even imagery of voluntary orofacial movements involves activation of face SI as well as face MI (and Cited by: 6.

As the tongue region in humans has fine somatosensory sensation and can perform sophisticated movements, the area of the primary sensorimotor cortex that represents the tongue occupies a wide distribution relative to its actual size in the body (Penfield and Rasmussen, ).However, relatively few studies have examined the cortical mechanisms related to sensorimotor functions of the tongue Cited by: 1.

Of the single neurons recorded within the face motor cortex, were located at sites from which ICMS (less than or equal to 20 microA) could evoke tongue movements (i.e., "tongue-MI" sites. The function of the jaw muscles in relation to sensorimotor control of these movements may be subject to ageing‐related declines.

This review will focus on peripheral, brainstem and higher brain centre mechanisms involved in reflex regulation and sensorimotor coordination and control of jaw Cited by: In particular, we have shown that reversible cold block of the awake monkey’s face motor cortex (MI), including tongue-MI, significantly reduces the successful performance of a trained tongue protrusion task, but causes little disruption of a biting task (Murray, Lin, Moustafa & Sessle, ).

articulator movements, we have developed a system to simulta-neously measure cortical activity using high-resolution electro-corticography (ECoG) while directly monitoring the lips and jaw with a camera, and the tongue with ultrasound.

We previously detailed a technical description of. This review describes evidence in subprimates and primates that the face primary somatosensory cortex (face SI) and primary motor cortex (face MI) are involved in sensorimotor integration and control of orofacial motor functions that include semiautomatic movements (e.g., chewing, swallowing) and voluntary movements (e.g., jaw-opening).

lateral pericentral cortex in the monkey (Macaca fascicularis). network for the control of tongue movements, including the lateral primary sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor cortex. the sensorimotor cortex in motor control. By developing an engineering model of sensorimotor cortical signal pro-cessing during limb movement in particular, we hope to obtain a deeper understanding of how brain-like devices provide flexible, adaptableand robust motor control.

Primary applications envisioned are the design of controllers. In this paper, we particularly consider the organization of the forelimb motor representation, and its relation to the representation of other parts of the body. I.c.m.s. thresholds of about 5 μA were common for evoking twitch movements and e.m.g.

responses in distal forelimb and face, jaw and tongue muscles, but proximal forelimb, trunk and. Sensorimotor integration is important for the acquisition and performance of motor skills. Here, we show the emergence of neuroplastic changes in the interactions between the motor and somatosensory areas of the primate cortex during learning.

Interareal coherence is frequency- and network-specific and exhibits a spatiotemporal organization. Time-sensitive sensorimotor integration. In barbiturate-anesthetized monkeys, single cortical neurons were found that could be antidromically activated by brain stem stimulation in the contra.

The orofacial sensorimotor cortex is known to play a role in motor learning. However, how motor learning changes the dynamics of neuronal activity and whether these changes differ between orofacial primary motor (MIo) and somatosensory (SIo) cortices remain unknown.

To address these questions, we used chronically implanted microelectrode arrays to track learning-induced changes in. PDF | Skilled movements rely on sensory information to shape optimal motor responses, for which the sensory and motor cortical areas are critical.

How | Find, read and cite all the research you. Based upon the histological verification, the ICMS sites from which rhythmic jaw movements were induced during QW (Figures 2 and and3) 3) were located in the deep part of the left cortical masticatory a34,35,51 in the Macaca fascicularis monkey (Figure 3) and in the principal part of the left cortical masticatory a34,35,48 in the.

that cortical control of the jaw and tongue muscles allows for fine regulation and accurate coordination of jaw and tongue movements needed to ex ecute fast and highly com.

Our previous study showed that the somatotopic locations of sensorimotor cortex activity differed between hand and jaw movement (Iida et al., ). However, in the sensorimotor cortex, the anatomical locations were on the border between the motor cortical areas involved in tongue motor control and jaw motor control (Penfield and Boldrey, Neuroplasticity of face primary motor cortex control of orofacial movements.

Sessle BJ(1), Adachi K, Avivi-Arber L, Lee J, Nishiura H, Yao D, Yoshino K. lower incisors or damage to the rat's lingual nerve can result in significant changes in the MI representations of the tongue or jaw muscles.

These various findings suggest that the face MI. The cortical masticatory area (CMA) elicits rhythmic jaw movements in response to repetitive stimulation and is involved in the control of mastication. Based on jaw movement. During speech production, we make vocal tract movements with remarkable precision and speed.

Our understanding of how the human brain achieves such proficient control is limited, in part due to the challenge of simultaneously acquiring high-resolution neural recordings and detailed vocal tract measurements. To overcome this challenge, we combined ultrasound and video monitoring of the.

The cortical masticatory area (CMA) elicits rhythmic jaw movements in response to repetitive stimulation and is involved in the control of mastication. Based on jaw movement patterns, the CMA is divided into two parts. One is the part of the CMA in which a T-pattern similar to jaw movements during food transport in natural mastication is evoked by electrical stimulation.

Tongue MEPs and masseter MEPs were significantly higher after TLT + TBT than after TBT or TLT (P jaw and tongue movement training is associated with a greater degree of neuroplasticity in the corticomotor control of jaw and tongue muscles than either task alone.